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Brandee Ketchum
Class of 2009

"I chose LSU Law Center because I was looking for an affordable school with a good academic reputation and an international perspective. I was also surprised to find students from such broad academic backgrounds."

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Louisiana State Agricultural & Mechanical College was established by an act of the legislature, approved to carry out the U.S. Morrill Act of 1862, granting lands for this purpose. It temporarily opened in New Orleans in 1874, where it remained until it merged with Louisiana State University in 1877.

BICENTENNIAL OF THE LOUISIANA CIVIL CODE

In 2008, the LSU Paul M. Hebert Law Center commemorated the Bicentennial of the Louisiana Civil Code, marking the confirmed survival of the civil law in Louisiana after the 1803 Purchase to France.

The year 1808 is considered the birth date of the Louisiana Civil Codes because it is that of A Digest of the Civil Laws in Force in the Territory of Orleans, frequently referred to as the Louisiana Civil Code of 1808. It is a digest of the Spanish civil laws then in force, modeled in form on the Code civil des Français of 1804 and its Projet de l'An VIII (1800). It was amended to become the Louisiana Civil Code of 1825, itself superseded by the Louisiana Civil Code of 1870 presently in force. The Louisiana State Law Institute, created in 1938, prepared substantial revisions of the Civil Code, keeping it up to date.

The Digest of 1808 was the first civil code-like legislation to be drafted anywhere in the world, in the wake of the Napoleonic codification. It still has a significant influence not only in the United States but also in Quebec, Latin America, and Spain.

See the Bicentennial Events


Paul M. Hebert Law Center   |    1 E. Campus Dr.   |    Louisiana State University   |    Baton Rouge, LA 70803   |   225/578-5292